Eric Lefkofsky Brings Change to Medical World With Tempus

Eric Lefkofsky first kickstarted his career with the public releases of companies InnerWorkings and Echo Global Logistics. While these are not widely known to the public, you probably are familiar with Groupon, his other company. Through these startups, Eric has already generated $1.79 billion and is set to bring in even more money as the years go on. He is continually looking to improve and scouting for new business opportunities.

More recently he and his partner Brad Keywell released an intricate genomic database for cancer called Tempus. This company has high goals and is meant for doctors to use in order to compare patient DNA. This will lead to more advanced treatments and therapy schedules. This might even allow some cancer patients to extend their lifetime or find an individual cure. Eric thought of this idea when he noticed how quickly technology was advancing compared to medicine. Doctors have huge amounts of data collected but no generalized database to analyze and compare it together. Eric is already working to introduce Tempus to the highest trafficked hospitals in order to begin gathering and analyzing data as soon as possible. The company also has a private lab where gene-sequencing investigations will occur.Eric is no longer directly involved with Groupon, though he is still a chairman. He has channeled the majority of his focus into Tempus which he believes will be more rewarding to others. He put Kevin White, esteemed geneticist, in a top position where his expertise can have great benefit to the company.

In addition to his business endeavors, Eric also works to give back to his community and help others. Alongside his wife, Eric created the Lefkofsky Family Foundation in 2006. It is a private charity foundation that strives to assist high-impact initiatives and improves the communities it services.He is also involved in the community outside his own foundation. He serves as an adjunct professor at the University of Chicago and wrote a book called Accelerated Disruption. He is the Chairman for Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre Company. He is also the Trustee of Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, The Museum of Science and Industry, World Business Chicago, and the Art Institute of Chicago. Eric has devoted his entire life to bettering the lives of those around him.

Eric Pulier Shares His Success with Philanthropic Ventures

Eric Pulier is one of the most successful entrepreneurs in the United States. He grew up in Teaneck, New Jersey. By the time he was in the fourth grade, he was able to program computers like a professional. While in high school, he started a database company. He got his B.S Degree from Harvard in English. While he was at Harvard, he took extra classes at MIT in technology.

 

He moved to Los Angeles after graduation and started a company, called People Doing Things. The firm focused on using technology to solve issues in health care and education. In 1994, he started Digital Evolution. In 1998, Eric decided to merge the company with U.S. Interactive, LLC. Eric is co-founder of ServiceMesh, Inc. and is currently its Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. Pulier founded SOA Software, in 1988. He was their Chairman and CEO from 1995 to 1998.

 

Eric has over 20 years’ experience in the software and digital interactive industries. He is currently Executive Chairman of Loa Software at LogicLibrary, Inc. He currently serves as Executive Director of the Enterprise Cloud Leadership Counsel. Pulier is one of the most successful entrepreneurs in the government and enterprise technology.

 

Eric Pulier is extremely busy running his companies and serving on boards, however, he is also very active in philanthropy. He donates to several charitable organizations. He helped create a multimedia educational program, designed to teach people with Multiple Sclerosis more about their illness. He helped make a way for home computers used by those with impaired motor skills to control their keyboards.

 

Pulier donated capital to Starlight Foundation to help children with chronic illnesses to communicate with other children with similar experiences. The program linked 75 hospitals in the U.S. allowing kids to video conference each other. These are just a few of the ways Pulier uses his knowledge to help those less fortunate.